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Bemerkenswerte Menschen


The Neuro-Adventures of Oliver Sacks

Oliver Sacks was the beloved doctor of strong souls in afflicted bodies. He was a neurologist
with an eye for the invisible, the medical detective who found himself addicted to his patients
in the back wards and to writing about them. Most famous of all was “The Man Who Mistook
His Wife for a Hat,” a classic Sacks title. And now, four year after his death, we have a Sacks
saga just as compelling, in what amounts to clinical notes on the man himself.
It is Lawrence Weschler’s record of a 30-year friendship that was supposed to produce a giant
New Yorker profile but didn’t—a story within the story. Instead we have a portrait of a singular
soul’s attachment to science, and music, and being human. Listen


Oliver Sacks’s typescript

Oliver Sacks’s typescript of “The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat”
as it appears in a book published last month to mark the London Review of Book's
40th anniversary. You can view all 29 pages of the manuscript here.

1933 als Sohn eines jüdischen Ärztepaares in London geboren, war Oliver Sacks
der Weg in einen naturwissenschaftlichen Beruf früh vorgezeichnet. Als Kind
versenkte er sich in seinem chemischen Labor in die verborgenen Zusammenhänge
der Welt – und wäre am liebsten selbst ein großer Chemiker geworden, zur Not auch
Meeresbiologe. Aber als er vierzehn war, stand fest, dass auch er Arzt werden würde.
Mit 27 Jahren verließ er Großbritannien; nach wilden Jahren in San Francisco und
Los Angeles fand er schließlich an der Beth-Abraham-Klinik in der New Yorker Bronx
zu seiner Bestimmung.


Oliver Sacks: His Own Life

Ric Burns, Kate Edgar, and Bill Hayes discuss Oliver Sacks:
His Own Life at the world premiere at the 57th New York Film Festival
For decades, Oliver Sacks, M.D. captured the imagination of the public with his eloquently written case studies of cognitive disorders. Despite sharing with the world one revelation after another about the intricacies, idiosyncrasies, and amazements of the human mind, Sacks remained private for much of his life, specifically about his struggles growing up gay in the repressive England of the 1950s. In Ric Burns’s invigorating documentary, partly shot before Sacks’s death in 2015 and featuring extensive scenes with the man himself, we get to know Sacks, from his childhood with a schizophrenic older brother, to his years as a champion bodybuilder and motorcycle aficionado, to his remarkable accomplishments as one of our foremost neurologists, including his groundbreaking work on patients with the sleeping sickness encephalitis lethargica, which became the basis for his book Awakenings. Burns’s documentary is a fitting and moving tribute to a man who never stopped wondering what it was like to be in the head of another sentient being. Video


Oliver Sacks & Halluzinationen

Was Halluzinationen über unsere Psyche enthüllen
Der Neurologe und Autor Oliver Sacks macht uns mit dem Charles-Bonnett-Syndrom vertraut, bei dem sehbehinderte Menschen lebhafte Halluzinationen erleben. Er beschreibt die Erfahrungen seiner Patienten in rührender Ausführlichkeit und erläutert uns die biologischen Hintergründe dieses wenig beachteten Phänomens. Zum Video (mit deutschen Untertiteln)


Interview mit Konstantin Wecker

"Poesie ist Widerstand" - Ein Interview mit Konstantin Wecker
Der Sänger und Liedermacher Konstantin Wecker spricht im Interview mit Tommy Millhome
über seine Drogensucht, Fridays for Future und über unser Leben in einer Wettbewerbs-
gesellschaft. Auch Glaube ist für ihn eine wichtige Erfahrung: "Ich hielt spirituelle Erlebnisse
für selbstverständlich."
Sendung: DOMRADIO - Zum Audiobeitrag


Oliver Sacks snippets of conversation

Before Oliver Sacks passed away, he and his partner Bill Hayes, in an effort to preserve some of Oliver’s thoughts on his work and his life, bought a little tape recorder. Through snippets of conversation with Bill, and in moments recorded as Oliver whispered to himself as he wrote, listeners get a peek inside the head, and the life, of one of the greatest science
essayists of all time. Listen


Oliver Sacks: His Own Life

Oliver Sacks: His Own Life explores the life and work of the legendary neurologist
and storyteller, as he shares intimate details of his battles with drug addiction,
homophobia, and a medical establishment that accepted his work only decades after the fact.

Trailer
More about the film


Remembering Oliver Sacks

physician, naturalist, and writer extraordinaire - July 9, 1933-August 30, 2015.
“My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved;
I have been given much and I have given something in return; I have read
and traveled and thought and written. I have had an intercourse with the world,
the special intercourse of writers and readers.” - Oliver Sacks, Gratitude


My Travels with Oliver Sacks

By Lowell Handler
“L-L-Lowell, the English are the result of too much proper breeding,” said Oliver Sacks, neurologist and author, in December 1987. It was my first trip overseas. I was in my early thirties, Oliver in his mid-fifties, and I was working as his photographer.

I didn’t realize it at the time, but that sentence would stand not only as a joke about the English, but also as a partial explanation for how Oliver understood himself. He was shy and very polite, even restrained in many ways, the product of a medical and Jewish aristocracy.

Oliver’s mother was a surgeon, and his cousin was the Israeli diplomat Abba Eban.
When I met Oliver’s father that same year, the elder Dr. Sacks was ninety-two years old
and still practicing medicine at the house in London where Oliver was raised.
As Oliver explains in his last book published during his lifetime, On the Move,
he rebelled against this upbringing and arrived in San Francisco leather clad on a motorcycle.
He later moved to Los Angeles, where he was a resident in neurology at UCLA,
feasting on hallucinogens and the endorphin highs of weight-lifting.
Read more

1933 als Sohn eines jüdischen Ärztepaares in London geboren, war Oliver Sacks der Weg
in einen naturwissenschaftlichen Beruf früh vorgezeichnet. Als Kind versenkte er sich
in seinem chemischen Labor in die verborgenen Zusammenhänge der Welt –
und wäre am liebsten selbst ein großer Chemiker geworden, zur Not auch Meeresbiologe.
Aber als er vierzehn war, stand fest, dass auch er Arzt werden würde.
Mit 27 Jahren verließ er Großbritannien; nach wilden Jahren in San Francisco und Los Angeles fand er
schließlich an der Beth-Abraham-Klinik in der New Yorker Bronx zu seiner Bestimmung.

Die Hollywood-Verfilmung seines Erstlings «Awakenings – Zeit des Erwachens» (1991)
mit Robert de Niro und Robin Williams machten ihn berühmt, seine neurologischen Fallgeschichten
zu einer medizinisch-literarischen Institution.

Oliver Sacks starb am 30. August 2015 in New York City.

Webseite von Oliver Sacks